Saturday, 25 August 2018

Announcing The Leon Daye Band and 'The Gift' Review

L to R standing: Jason Hughes, keyboard; Ian Keats, bass; Mike Herbert, lead. Seated: Brendan Downes-Hall, drums; Leon Daye, guitar and vocals. Pictured in garden of The Vaults @ Golden Farm Inn


THE LEON DAYE BAND
by Carlo Vuolo

Cirencester singer/songwriter Leon Daye is well known on the local pub, club and festival circuit and has been performing for a number of years as a solo artist. Leon’s first CD, ‘Bird on a Wire’, released in 2016, was very well received and this has been followed up by his latest collection of his own songs ‘The Gift’ which was produced in collaboration with multi-instrumentalist and producer Aron Attwood at the Buffalo Deluxe studios in Stroud.

Leon has now teamed up with local musicians Jason Mark Hughes (keyboards), Ian Keates (bass), Mike Herbert (lead guitar) and Brendan Downes-Hall (drums) to form The Leon Daye Band with Leon on guitar and lead vocals. The band made their debut at The Vaults at the Golden Farm at the end of July to launch ‘The Gift’ to great critical acclaim and feel honoured to be performing on the main Cosy Powell stage at this year’s Phoenix Festival (Sunday). Then it’s onto the Goatfest festival in early September before returning to the Vaults in November.

Leon is very excited about this new direction for his music as he will be no longer working alone and has already seen some of his songs evolve as each band member brings their own ideas and interpretations to the mix. Whilst he will still be working the circuit as a solo artist, the band’s development will be Leon’s major focus from now on and work has already started on the band’s first CD. All the band members are very optimistic about the future and there is a real sense of purpose and commitment to the venture. As guitarist Mike says ‘It’s gonna be big’.

The Gift
Review by Evan Burgess


Leon Daye is back with a new record available on Spotify and no doubt in hard copy from the man himself. “The Gift” is a 6-track offering from the local songwriter known for playing both covers and originals with the same quality. This record makes an impression with a very well recorded musical ensemble. The vocals are crisp and recall Paul Heaton, with a similar strong enunciation that will allow people to sing along after only a few plays.



The record has some major key songs such as “Building a Life”, but also some ballads and lush major/minor modulations, such as “A Reason to Live” that recalls “Wichita Lineman” by Glen Campbell. This clarity is great and in my opinion is a testament to an ever-developing recording artist. There will be a lot of gems that come up in repeated listening such as subtle harmonies and counterpoint melodies.

Leon’s voice is a stamp of quality throughout the record, which will please fans who have known for years how it cuts through crowded bars. But here it finds a unique space in the mix that must be largely down to the high quality of recording and production. If you have the chance to see Leon perform don’t miss it!


Check out the following live dates!

Solo:
The Lower Lode , Forthampton Sun 26th Aug
Check out forthcoming dates.
Rising Sun ,Chelt
Friday 31st Aug
Nottingham Arms, Tewkesbury , Sun 2nd Sept
The Merryfellow , Charlton Kings
Friday 7th Sept The Royal Exchange, Hartpury, Friday 14th Sept

With Band:
The Phoenix festival Ciren , Sunday 26th 3.35

Goatfest, Goatacre wilts , Saturday 8th Sept 1pm


www.leondaye.com

Thursday, 23 August 2018

Leon Daye-The Gift Review

Leon Daye Band at the Vaults, where the record can be bought!
Evan Burgess reviews Leon Daye's latest release...
Leon Daye is back with a new record available digitally on Spotify, iTunes and others. Meanwhile the hard copy is on sale at the Vaults Cirencester and from the man himself at shows. “The Gift” is a 6-track offering from the local songwriter known for playing both covers and originals with the same quality. This record makes an impression with a very well recorded musical ensemble. The vocals are crisp and recall Paul Heaton, with a similar strong enunciation that will allow people to sing along after only a few plays.
The record has an abundance of major key songs such as “Building a Life”, but also some ballads and lush major/minor modulations, such as “A Reason to Live” that recalls “Wichita Lineman” by Glen Campbell. This clarity is great and in my opinion is a testament to an ever-developing recording artist. There will be a lot of gems that come up in repeated listening such as subtle harmonies and counterpoint melodies.
Leon’s voice is a stamp of quality throughout the record, which will please fans who have known for years how it cuts through crowded bars. But here it finds a unique space in the mix that must be largely down to the high quality of recording and production. If you have the chance to see Leon perform don’t miss it!
Check out the following live dates.
Solo:
 The Lower Lode , Forthampton Sun 26th Aug
Check out forthcoming dates.

Rising Sun ,Chelt
Friday 31st Aug
Nottingham Arms, Tewkesbury , Sun 2nd Sept
The Merryfellow , Charlton Kings
Friday 7th Sept
The Royal Exchange, Hartpury, Friday 14th Sept

With Band:
The Phoenix festival Ciren , Sunday 26th 3.35

Goatfest, Goatacre wilts , Saturday 8th Sept 1pm

www.leondaye.com

Saturday, 18 August 2018

Cirencester Hypnotherapy & Health Centre August 2018

Nicola Griffiths

Keeping my brain in tip top condition!
I was recently reading an article by Harvard Health - they do tend to send out some rather useful e-newsletters. This one was on Cognitive Health, rather a hot topic recently.  This is something I take a keen interest in given we see a lot of people at the clinic suffering with anxiety and depression.  The Harvard report didn’t come up with anything new, but sometimes a reminder can be useful.  So what did this report say?
Well, basically, it said to eat a plant-based diet; exercise regularly; get enough sleep; manage stress; nurture social contacts and, finally, continue to challenge your brain. Easy then!!
Together, the above can yield real results, leading to changes in both your brain's structure and function. I have to say, when I read how easily we can change the structure of our brain it always fills me with awe, and it’s true, we can.  But the key word to watch out for in the above is the first word of this paragraph: "Together."
None of the actions listed works that well in isolation. Simply eating more fibre or adding a morning walk to your routine isn't enough to forestall mental decline. Instead, exercise, diet, sleep, stress management, social interaction, and mental stimulation work in concert to yield results. 
I’m on a bit of a mission at the moment to get fitter.  So I’m spending more time in the fruit & veg shop, I’ve given hubby our elderly lab to walk as she’s very slow and I’ve taken over with the lurcher (which could seriously end in tears the way she takes off sometimes), I’m going to bed earlier, I’ve reduced my work load, I’ve booked in cups of tea with friends and I’ve got the jigsaw out to challenge the brain.
In fact, I’ve surprised myself at how well I’m doing.  How have I managed to change some bad decades-old habits?  Well, funnily enough, the hypnotherapist is having hypnotherapy! Yep, I actually practice what I preach.  A good hypnotherapist knows they have to look after themselves in order to look after others.  
Hypnotic trance is a normal thing that everyone experiences on a daily basis, i.e. whilst driving along a route you know very well and you think “how did I get here”?  In this trance state the brain comes out of defence mode and can see things from a different perspective, this allows us to change templates in the brain and come up with alternative solutions. Not quite magic as we don’t have magic wands, but it is incredible what we see clients achieve.
As I’m always saying, you don’t actually have to believe that you can change, the belief process kicks in once you see the change happening.  All you need is to ‘want’ to change.
Oh, and by the way, we’re all about neuroscience, not swinging fob watches!
For those people wanting to change, get in touch with the clinic on 01285 652449 or visit www.cirencesterhypnotherapycentre.co.uk.

Corinium Vets August 2018: Swimming for Dogs

Milo and Nala enjoy the river.

Swimming for Dogs

Swimming is a great activity in the summer and can help your dog to stay cool while exercising. As long as you are cautious and sensible you and your pet should be able to have fun and stay safe in the water.

While rivers, streams and seas have the benefit of being clearer of infectious agents, running water can be misleadingly fast. Favour slow-moving rivers or streams. On the beach be aware of jelly fish and strong tides. Some dogs will swallow enough sea water to get salt poisoning which can be very serious.

Some dogs can’t swim or can’t hold their heads above water, this is true for most bulldogs and other brachycephalics (flat nosed breeds). If your dog is very old, very young, or gets tired easily it is important to monitor their swimming to make sure they aren’t getting out of their depth. Don’t let your dog swim too far from the bank or shore.

All natural bodies of water, particularly stagnant water, can contain a wide range of different types of bacteria, parasites and toxins. The majority of waterborne illnesses are transmitted by ingestion or skin contact, often causing diarrhoea and vomiting. Generally these illnesses are not life threatening as long as they are caught and treated appropriately in a timely manner.

Leptospirosis is a serious bacterial infection which can be passed on through water, for example from canals, streams, ponds and lakes contaminated with the urine of rats or other small rodents. Leptospirosis can spread to liver and kidney. It is a zoonotic infection, meaning they can be passed on to humans too.

Dogs should be vaccinated against leptospirosis annually.

Blue-green algae are not always obvious as algae bloom. Dogs can suffer from acute toxicity if they drink contaminated water. Fatalities have been reported.

Always have water on hand for your pet to drink so they won’t feel the need to drink stagnant water. If your pet shows signs of being unwell, seek veterinary advice quickly and remember to state that your pet has been swimming.

Dr Bettina Gruninger (Veterinary Surgeon), Alison Cuss and Nichola Wray (Veterinary nurses), Corinium Veterinary Surgery.


Alison Fielden & Co: Auctions

Get advice at a local law firm.

Buying or selling at auction: some benefits and potential disadvantages.
Whether it’s a modest one bedroom flat or a major city centre site with commercial tenants in occupation, auctions are now seen as a useful option for those looking to buy or sell a property, and have recently seen increasing activity from ‘ordinary’ buyers and sellers in addition to the usual activity of lenders wanting to quickly resell properties repossessed from defaulting borrowers.
Provided that one is aware of, and makes allowances for, some potential drawbacks, an auction is something which can have considerable advantages for a buyer or seller. Perhaps the most obvious of these is that by using an auction, one can avoid all the issues to do with potential delays involved in chain transactions, and that a buyer or seller can achieve some certainty in that a deal is either secured on the day or not.
At auction, a sale becomes binding when an offer is accepted by the auctioneer and the hammer comes down to close the deal. The buyer will then have to sign a contract or memorandum of sale and immediately put down a non-refundable deposit of approximately 10% of the price.  A definite date is fixed for completion at this point, which is typically 4 - 6 weeks after the date of the auction which is when the change of ownership of the property takes place, and the balance of the money is paid over.
Although many auction sales and purchases may proceed to a smooth and satisfactory conclusion, there are risks and drawbacks involved which may unseat those who are not aware of the potential pitfalls, and this is why proper professional advice from a legal advisor is highly recommended.
For the seller, it is vital that a proper, comprehensive legal pack for the property is put together by a property professional, who will make sure that the pack provides for the buyers to reimburse the seller for all searches supplied and may, if the seller so wishes, also make provision for the buyer to contribute towards the sellers legal fees.  This is important as failure to supply a properly prepared legal pack may jeopardise the whole transaction, even after the auction itself, if issues subsequently come to light which affect the property but which have not been dealt with in the sales pack.
There are significant risks also for the buyer. Once a bid has been accepted by the auctioneer and the hammer comes down to close the deal, a binding contract comes into existence between the seller and the buyer which cannot be avoided by the buyer on the grounds that he or she does not have the finance in place to complete the transaction, or that there has been insufficient time to organise a proper survey or inspection of the property.
These and many other matters need to be addressed before the auction. A buyer may, for example, need to take in consideration such issues as Stamp Duty Land Tax, VAT, Capital Allowances and insurance, which may be the buyer’s responsibility from the date of the auction onwards, and therefore would be wise to seek advice on these matters before committing him or herself to a purchase.
In addition, a buyer will clearly need to ensure that the property which is being purchased is not affected by any adverse legal interests. This requires the legal pack to be properly checked by somebody who is professionally qualified to do so, and again, that is where the services of a legal advisor will be indispensable.
This is particularly important where the buyer is looking to buy a property with an existing tenant in place, whether this should be a tenant of a shop, factory, office block, house or flat. The buyer will be bound by the terms of the existing lease or tenancy agreement of the property and it is vital therefore that proper legal advice is sought on the terms of such legally binding agreements so that the buyer is fully informed as to his or her obligations before proceeding to make a bid for the property.
Another important issue which may need to be addressed is where buyers may want to borrow against the property that they are hoping to purchase, as all existing leases or tenancies of the property must be acceptable to the lender. This again is where a buyer would be wise to seek proper legal advice on the matter before proceeding.
Further, the role of a legal advisor will continue after the auction to deal with such matters as paying any Stamp Duty Land Tax due on the transaction, giving notices of change of ownership to tenants, and of course dealing with the buyer’s registration of title to the property at Land Registry.
One final point to mention is the complex area of guide prices and reserve prices. A property may have a guide price of a certain figure but it does not necessarily mean that this is what it will sell for, or indeed that it is the minimum price that is acceptable to the seller.  This is evidenced by the commonly seen practice of properties attracting offers at auctions but not being sold because the reserve price has not been reached.  Such practices may make it difficult to secure real bargains but, with proper advice, there are still good deals to be secured for buyers who are properly organised, and are fully aware of the legal implications of a successful bid. Building up experience and expertise can be a great help with auctions, particularly when backed up with the right legal advice.
Both Graeme Gaston and Alison Fielden have many years experience in acting for both buyers and sellers, at auction and in other forms of sale.
For a professional legal service please contact Alison Fielden & Co on 01285 653261.

Monday, 13 August 2018

Citizens Advice Bureau Activities in August

The CAB team.
Citizens Advice and Friends get busy

The last two weekends of August are promising to be busy ones for Citizens Advice Cotswold District and the Friends of Cirencester CAB.

On Sunday 19th August, Citizens Advice Cotswold District will be helping with car parking at the very popular BRIMPSFIELD POSH CAR BOOT SALE, run by the Brimpsfield Music Society, which will be held at the Longdole Polo Club near Brimpsfield from 11 am to 3 pm. The event organisers have generously nominated Citizens Advice Cotswold District to be their event partners. Quality caterers will be on site so you can make a day of it. Further details can be seen on events@brimpsfieldmusicsociety.co.uk

The following weekend, on Saturday and Sunday 25th and 26th August, Citizens Advice and Friends will once again have their tent up at the Phoenix Festival, held in the Cirencester Abbey grounds just to the rear of the Parish Church. Entrance is free. This event is hugely popular with both local families and visitors, with great live music and caterers and entertainment for all ages. So come along and look out for the Citizens Advice tent, and learn more about how Citizens Advice is helping many people in the local community to find the best solution to their problems by providing free and confidential advice that is open to all.  By the tent there will be the ever popular “climb the wall” game that many youngsters and grownups alike find they can’t get enough of, so come and have a go!

Wednesday, 8 August 2018

Country Matters by the Hodge August 2018 Using Local Water Resources

A Crayfish

Country Matters 
By The Hodge 
“In nature there is nothing melancholy.” 
Samuel Taylor Coleridge 1172-1834 – The Nightingale 

It may not seem like it when we’re sweltering in humid sunshine and the rivers drop to a trickle but here around Cirencester we are surrounded by water. There’s the Thames and the Churn and the Windrush and, of course, the old gravel pits now grandly rebranded The Cotswold Water Park, an area of water greater than the Norfolk Broads, apparently.

And lurking within all these freshwaters is a foreign invader every bit as a pest as the American grey squirrel which has almost single-handedly driven out the native red squirrel from practically all of England, most of Wales and large parts of Scotland. But despite reports that the grey squirrel, which also consumes large volumes of songbird eggs and chicks, is edible which I personally cannot vouch for, (looks too much like a rat for my liking), I can assure you that the American signal crayfish is quite delicious and should be consumed by a wider audience for very good conservation reasons.

The signal crayfish – Pacifastacus leniusculus – was imported to be farmed as a food source but the little critters are no respecters of boundaries and, once ensconced in a nice lake in the Water Park, they decide to go exploring in someone else’s lake or river and soon the whole area is infested with them. Looking like miniature lobsters, they attack and eat the smaller native white-clawed crayfish – Austropotamobius pallipes – resulting in that little fellow now being endangered. It also attacks small fish and consumes huge quantities of fish eggs so they are not ideal companions to conservationists or anglers.

In Scandinavia they are highly regarded as a treat and there they hold kräftpremiär parties where crayfish and aquavit are consumed in great joy whereas in Louisiana, similar celebrations are known as ‘crawfish boils’ or ‘mudpuppies’. They really are delicious although you will need quite a few before you cry “enough!”

As I said earlier, they are widespread around the area and easily caught but you do need an official permit in order to hunt them as well as the water-owner’s permission. In the days of my youth – no ribald comments, please – village lads would collect a sheep’s head from the butcher, tie it to a length of string and toss it in the water. Retrieving it several days later, the greedy little carnivores would have eaten their way through flesh and brain and with any luck when it was hauled out up to a dozen would be found hanging on to their dinner.

Today, you need a trap and its specification is to be found at the same website where you can apply for a permit to catch them between May and September - https://www.gov.uk/guidance/permission-to-trap-crayfish-eels-elvers-salmon-and-sea-trout#crayfish-trap-authorisation. The traps must be constructed so as not to accidently catch or injure water voles or otters.

When you begin trapping them, using a meat- or fish-based bait, you will usually trap the larger, more aggressive males. These big fellas – as well as eating almost everything else they can find – will happily consume their own offspring so in conservation terms you may think that by getting rid of these you will cause a population explosion. Fear not! Keep trapping and as the males become fewer, you will start catching some of the smaller females or less mature males, emboldened by the decline of the big bulls and numbers will decrease.

Set yourself up properly and you may be able to get sufficient on a regular basis to supply a local pub or restaurant and thereby secure an income as well as getting rid of a pest.

Once caught, like prawns, the crayfish will need either purging in aerated freshwater, (with a lid to prevent further escapes) or by removal of the digestive tract.

So, what could be better? Get out in the fresh air, catch a delicious supper almost free of charge and help rid us a vicious pest that should never have reached our wild waters. Good fishing!